Between Person and Place

2010.BP&P cover_Page_1.png
+PB397_KLT_Curtis1.png
+PB397_KLT_Davidson1.png
2010.BP&P cover_Page_1.png
+PB397_KLT_Curtis1.png
+PB397_KLT_Davidson1.png

Between Person and Place

12.66

Conservation Histories from the Kennebec Land Trust

Featuring essays and photographs that capture the stories behind KLT’s conservation lands, the book is based on a series of interviews conducted by KLT intern Katie Epstein, from Davidson College, in the summer of 2009.  Epstein asked eighteen land donors such questions as, Why did Governor Kenneth Curtis donate his family farm in Leeds to a land trust? How are the Vaughan Woods in Hallowell intertwined with American history? Why is a forest in Wayne with 125-year old oaks and pines called Gott Pasture?

 (Price Includes 5.5% ME Sales Tax)

Quantity:
Add

Theresa Kerchner, KLT Executive Director, notes: “If you own your own land, roam the countryside, or spend summers in Maine, you will identify with the people and places in this book. We hope that these stories inspire people to visit lands that are open to the public and to learn more about the importance of conserving land in Maine for current and future generations.”

Between Person and Place is edited by Theresa Kerchner, Barbara Libby, and Deborah Sewall. The forty-eight page book will be available as of August 22, 2010. Copies of Between Person and Place can be ordered here online for $12.00 each plus sales tax and shipping.

The publication of Between Person and Place would not have been possible without the time and expertise generously provided by the LPK Foundation in Cincinnati, Ohio, which is committed to social responsibility and advancing the goals of sustainability. Mort Libby, Principal of LPK, is a founding member of KLT. Mort and his wife Barbara are East Winthrop summer residents.

Ties between people and the land run deep in Maine. Between Person and Place: Conservation Histories from the Kennebec Land Trust captures the diverse human stories behind places in the Kennebec Valley and how they came to be protected.
— Colin Woodard, Author of The Lobster Coast: Rebels, Rusticators, and the Struggle for a Forgotten Frontier
This book celebrates the natural beauty and richness of central Maine, its lakes and streams, its forests and farms, its myriad creatures great and small. It celebrates the dedication and energy of the men and women who founded the Kennebec Land Trust and have made it one of Maine’s most effective land-conservation organizations. It celebrates the generosity of the good people whose stories are chronicled here and whose love of their places has moved them to protect those lands in perpetuity either by outright donation or by conservation easements. This book is an inspiration. Go, it tells the rest of us, and do likewise.
— Robert Kimber, Author of A Canoeist's Sketchbook and Upcountry
Maine has so many heroic stories of land conservation. This collection of essays brings that home unlike any other because it looks at the very people who made the protection achieved by the Kennebec Land Trust possible. Each of these stories is different, but each looks at people who cared enough to pass it on, and each is worth reading.
— Deirdre Fleming, Outdoors writer, Portland Press Herald/Maine Sunday Telegram and MaineToday Media